Instructors

PR~statistics prides itself on the quality of its instructors. Experts in their field, many are involved in the development of new methods; author and contribute to ‘packages’ and have published scientific material in their field. Most importantly they are skilled and experienced in teaching and portraying the application of statistical theory and methods in a clear and easy to understand manner.

You can read about all of our course instructors below, listed alphabetically, click on the green toggle to find out where they work, which courses  they teach and about their research interests.

Dr. Oliver Hooker

Director of course development

Works at: – PR statistics (Director)

Oliver obtained his PhD in ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Glasgow (July 2012 – June 2016). His PhD research was in the area of ecologically driven evolution and speciation in postglacial fish, and how these processes complicate the application and planning of successful conservation strategies, especially in species that exhibit high levels of phenotypic structuring. Oliver thesis was very broad with chapters published on various topics ranging from morphology and physiology to legislation. Some of his work includes studying anthropogenic influences on phenotypic structuring within populations of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) as well as investigating the physiological mechanisms that may drive and/or maintain ecologically driven speciation. In particular Oliver is interested in furthering the understanding of how genetic isolation arises in sympatric polymorphic populations of Arctic charr and brown trout, (Salmo trutta).

Prior to his PhD Oliver attended the University of Hull from September 2009 – June 2012 where he achieved a first class degree (83% average) with honours in Marine and Freshwater Biology. He was awarded the departmental prize (for outstanding work) in both his second and third year. Oliver set up PR~statistics in April 2014 with the aim of providing specific training courses and workshops for people at varying stages of their academic career, delivered by experts in these fields.

PUBLICATIONS

7) Recknagel, H., Hooker, O. E., Adams, C. E. & Elmer, K. R. (2017) Ecosystem size predicts eco-morphological variability in a postglacial diversification. Ecology and Evolution.

Ecosystem size predicts eco- morphological variability in a postglacial diversification.

6) Hooker, O. E., Van Leeuwen, T.E.  & Adams, C. E. (2017) Physiological costs of prey switching reinforce foraging specialisation. Journal of Animal Ecology. 86, 605-614, [DOI 10.1111/1365-2656.12632]

Physiological costs of prey switching reinforce foraging specialisation

5) Adams, C. E., Bean, C. W., Dodd, J. A., Down, A.,  Etheridge, E. C., Gowans, A R. D., Hooker, O. E.,  Knudsen, R.,  Lyle, A. A., Winfield, I. J. & Præbel, K. (2016) Inter and intra-population phenotypic and genotypic structuring in the European whitefish, Coregonus lavaretus, a rare freshwater fish in Scotland. Journal of Fish Biology, 88(2), 580-594. [DOI 10.1111/jfb.12855]

Inter and intra-population phenotypic and genotypic structuring in the European whitefish Coregonus lavaretus, a rare freshwater fish in Scotland

4) Hooker, O. E., Barry, J., Van Leeuwen, T., Lyle, A., Newton, J., Cunningham, P. & Adams, C. E. (2016) Morphological, ecological and behavioural differentiation of sympatric profundal and pelagic Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) in Loch Dughaill Scotland. Hydrobiologia, 783(1), 209-221. [DOI 10.1007/s10750-015-2599-0]

Morphological, ecological and behavioural differentiation of sympatric profundal and pelagic Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) in Loch Dughaill Scotland

3) Van Leeuwen, T., Hooker, O. E., Metcalfe, N. & Adams, C. E. (2015) Differences in diet-induced flexibility in morphology and growth in a partially migratory species. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. [DOI 10.1139/cjfas-2015-0300]

Differences in diet-induced flexibility in morphology and growth in a partially migratory species

2) Hooker, O.E., Maitland, P. S., Bean, C. W. & Adams, C. E. (2015) Effectiveness of Local Biodiversity Action Plans to Identify Locally Rare and Endangered Fish in Scotland. Scottish Geographical Journal 1-11. [DOI 10.1080/14702541.2015.1077267]

Effectiveness of Local Biodiversity Action Plans to Identify Locally Rare and Endangered Fish in Scotland

1) Barry, J., Newton, M., Dodd, J. A., Hooker, O. E., Boylan, P., Lucas, M. C. & Adams, C. E. (2015) Foraging specialisms influence space use and movement patterns of the European eel Anguilla Anguilla. Hydrobiologia 1-16. [DOI 10.1007/s10750-015-2466-z]

Foraging specialisms influence space use and movement patterns of the European eel Anguilla Anguilla

Prof. Dean Adams

Full Bio:

Works at – Professor of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, and Professor of Statistics at Iowa State University, USA
Teaches – Geometric Morphometrics in R (GMMR)

Dean is a theoretical evolutionary biologist interested in the evolution of multivariate phenotypes. A primary emphasis of his laboratory focuses on new analytical tools for quantifying multivariate phenotypes (including morphometric shape analysis), as well as the development of new methods for characterizing patterns of phenotypic evolution and change. Current research is on the development of new phylogenetic comparative methods for multivariate datasets, and new morphometric methods for characterizing patterns of shape variation and covariation. Dean is the primary author and maintainer of the popular software R-package geomorph for shape analysis. His empirical work focuses on morphological evolution in vertebrates, with an emphasis on plethodontid salamanders.

Prof. Jarret Byrnes

Full Bio:

Works at – Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA.
Teaches – Structural equation modelling for ecologists and evolutionary biologists (SEMR)

Jarrett Byrnes is an Assistant Professor at the University of Massachusetts Boston where he has taught for five years. His research focuses on the direct and indirect effects of the changing environment on marine communities. His current work focuses on kelp forests at local and global scales as well as New England sat marshes.  In this work, Byrnes utilizes a wide variety of statistical techniques for large-scale data sets, from Structural Equation Modelling to Bayesian meta-analysis.

Byrnes has been teaching Structural Equation Modelling since 2010. He has contributed to the development of the sem and lavaan packages in R for the modelling of SEMs using likelihood and covariance matrices. In addition to publishing on SEMs both in his own work and as a collaborator with students, students of Byrnes’s classes have published over a dozen different manuscripts which started as projects within the course.

Prof. Michael Collyer

Full Bio:

Works at – Associate Professor and Director, MS Biology, at Chatham University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
Teaches – Geometric Morphometrics using R (GMMR)

Michael is a theoretical evolutionary ecologist, specializing in statistical methods for high-dimensional data.  He received his PhD in Zoology from North Dakota State University and received additional postdoctoral experience in Ecology, Evolution, & Organismal Biology, and Statistics at Iowa State University.  His current research focuses on methodological development of hypothesis testing frameworks for multivariate data, using phylogenetic comparative methods.  He is a co-developer of the R package, geomorph, which has various routines for the acquisition, processing, and analysis of shape data and other multivariate data.  Michael’s theoretical work compliments his empirical focus, which is the contemporary morphological evolution of North American desert fishes in changing environments.

Prof. Matt Denwood

Full Bio:

Works at – Associate Professor at University of Copenhagen
Teaches – Applied Bayesian Modelling for Ecologists and Epidemiologists (ABME)

Matt qualified as a veterinary surgeon from the University of Glasgow, and subsequently focussed his post-graduate training in the area of quantitative veterinary epidemiology, obtaining his PhD in 2010. His research focus spans from statistical methodology through to the application of statistical and mathematical modelling to problems in epidemiology and ecology, working on a wide variety of problems in various different fields.

Much of his work was revolved around the use of Bayesian methods, particularly Markov chain Monte Carlo, applied to parasitology and antimicrobial resistance. He is the author of two R packages hosted on CRAN, including the ‘runjags’ package which serves as an interface to ‘Just Another Gibbs Sampler (JAGS)’, and is also a developer and currently builds and maintains the Mac binaries on the JAGS project.

Matt is also a fellow of the higher education academy with a wide range of teaching experience in epidemiology, biostatistics, public health and clinical farm animal medicine at both undergraduate and postgraduate level, he enjoys the challenge of describing complex statistical methods in a way that is accessible to ecologists and epidemiologists with a background in clinical or biological sciences.

Prof. Rodney Dyer

Full Bio:

Works at – Assistant Director for the Centre for Environmental Studies, Virginia Commonwealth University
Teaches – Landscape (population) genetic data analysis using R (LNDG)

Matt qualified as a veterinary surgeon from the University of Glasgow, and subsequently focussed his post-graduate training in the area of quantitative veterinary epidemiology, obtaining his PhD in 2010. His research focus spans from statistical methodology through to the application of statistical and mathematical modelling to problems in epidemiology and ecology, working on a wide variety of problems in various different fields.

Much of his work was revolved around the use of Bayesian methods, particularly Markov chain Monte Carlo, applied to parasitology and antimicrobial resistance. He is the author of two R packages hosted on CRAN, including the ‘runjags’ package which serves as an interface to ‘Just Another Gibbs Sampler (JAGS)’, and is also a developer and currently builds and maintains the Mac binaries on the JAGS project.

Matt is also a fellow of the higher education academy with a wide range of teaching experience in epidemiology, biostatistics, public health and clinical farm animal medicine at both undergraduate and postgraduate level, he enjoys the challenge of describing complex statistical methods in a way that is accessible to ecologists and epidemiologists with a background in clinical or biological sciences.

Prof. Julia Koricheva

Full Bio:

Works at – Royal Holloway University of London
Teaches – Meta-analysis in ecology, evolution and environmental sciences (MTES)

Julia is an ecologist interested in plant-herbivore interactions, forest biodiversity and methodology and applications of meta-analysis in ecology. She has published over 20 meta-analyses on topics ranging from impacts of climate change to forest management as well as methodological papers on publication bias and related biases in meta-analysis. She has also co-edited “Handbook of meta-analysis in ecology and evolution” (Princeton University Press, 2013), the first handbook on meta-analysis written specially for ecologists and evolutionary biologists. Julia has been teaching courses on meta-analysis in ecology to early career researchers since early 2000s both in the UK and abroad (Finland, Sweden, Germany, Switzerland, Poland, Portugal, USA, Australia, Mexico, Brazil, Kenya). Julia is an elected member of the Society for Research Synthesis Methodology and an author of ca 100 peer-reviewed scientific publications with > 5000 citations, her H index is 40.

Prof. Elena Kulinskaya

Full Bio:

Works at – University of East Anglia (UEA), England
Teaches – Meta-analysis in ecology, evolution and environmental sciences (MTES)

Elena is a statistician with strong research interests in meta-analysis and research synthesis, statistical methods for Big Data, and wide experience of statistical consulting in health, actuarial, environmental sciences and industry. She is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute and of the Society for Research Synthesis Methodology; Editorial Board member for academic journals Environmental Evidence and Research Synthesis Methods, and the organiser of Quantitative Synthesis Methods Group in the Collaboration for Environmental Evidence (CEE). She has authored a book on meta-analysis (Wiley, 2008) and more than 100 peer-reviewed scientific publications with ca 3100 citations, h index = 29.

Prof. Pierre Legendre

Full Bio:

Works at – Professor of quantitative ecology at Université de Montréal, Canada
Teaches – Advances in Spatial Analysis of Multivariate Ecological Data: Theory and in Practice (MVSP)

Pierre Legendre is an ecologist interested in the spatial and temporal structure of communities (beta diversity). He has been teaching biostatistics and numerical ecology at Université de Montréal for more than 30 years. He is the author of the highly cited manual “Numerical ecology”; the third English edition appeared in June 2012. He is also the author of more than 290 refereed research papers and book chapters.

Numerical ecology is the field of quantitative ecology devoted to the numerical analysis of ecological data sets. Community ecologists, whose data are multivariate by nature (many species, many environmental variables), are the primary users of these methods.

Besides his regular teaching at Université de Montréal, Pierre Legendre has given 66 short courses in 38 universities and scientific institutes around the world. He received several honours, including the President’s Award of the Canadian Society for Ecology and Evolution in 2013. He was listed as a Highly Cited Researcher in Environment/Ecology in all lists published up to now by the Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) and Thomson Reuters in 2001, 2014 and 2015. His h-index on Google Scholar is 83 (57648 citations, including 14324 citations of his books). He is also the author of programs and R packages widely used by community ecologists and phylogeneticists, and coauthor (with D. Borcard and F. Gillet) of the book “Numerical ecology with R” (English edition published in 2011, Chinese edition in 2014).

Prof. Subhash Lele

Full Bio:

Works at – Professor of statistics, Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Teaches – Multivariate analysis of spatial ecological data using R (MASE)

Subhash Lele is a professor of statistics at the University of Alberta in Canada. His research interests are wide ranging from theoretical statistics (e.g. Estimating functions, Time series and Spatial processes, Foundations of statistical inference, Hierarchical models) to applied statistics (e.g. Morphometrics or analysis of shapes, Occupancy and Abundance models, Habitat suitability and Resource Selection models, Movement models, Population dynamics models, population viability analysis and sampling designs for animal surveys). He is currently involved in developing statistical methods for data obtained from camera traps for monitoring space use by wildlife.

Subhash Lele has been working in statistics for almost 30 years. He has published more than 80 papers in major journals including ‘Science’ and ‘Nature’. He has co-authored a book on Morphometrics, co-edited a book on the topic of quantification of statistical evidence and is currently working on a book on Likelihood analysis of Hierarchical models with applications in ecology. He has been on the editorial board of the Journal of the American Statistical Association, Ecology and Ecological Monographs, Ecological and Environmental Statistics, Journal of Wildlife Management and Journal of Animal Ecology. He has also served on various committees of the US National Academy of Sciences.

Prof. Jason Matthiopoulos

Full Bio:

Works at – Prof. of spatial and population ecology at the University of Glasgow
Teaches – Spatial Analysis of Ecological Data Using R (SPAE) & Applied Bayesian Modelling for Ecologists and Epidemiologists (ABME)

Jason Matthiopoulos is professor of spatial and population ecology at the University of Glasgow. He does research at the interface between mathematics, statistics and ecology, trying to formalize biological hypotheses into models that can then be informed by data.

He is interested in explaining how habitat structure results in observed patterns of population growth, why some animal populations cycle, what variables drive the distribution of populations, how patterns of disease spread can be predicted and managed, how animals navigate, what drives and sustains mass migrations, how marine renewable developments can be harmonized with conservation priorities, how fish stocks can be conserved and how to measure the fundamental niche of a species.

He has over 20 years’ experience in teaching quantitative methods to biologists of all ages and stages and has written a popular textbook on the topic. He has authored >60 peer-reviewed publications >30 government reports and has served as editor for Methods in Ecology and Evolution, Journal of Applied Ecology and Endangered Species Research.

Prof. David Warton

Full Bio:

Works at – Professor in Ecological Statistics at University of New South Wales
Teaches – Model-based multivariate analysis of abundance data using R (MBMV)

David is an ecological statistician who advances methodology for data analysis in ecology to improve the ability of ecologists to answer important research questions with a focus on developing and translating modern statistical approaches to important ecological problems.

His cross-disciplinary research involves evaluating the methods for data analysis currently used in ecology, and where necessary, developing new methodologies to assist ecologists answer key research questions. This has led to contributions to current practice in ecology in multivariate analysis, allometric line-fitting and the analysis of presence-only data.

Prof. Ziheng Yang

Full Bio:

Works at – Professor at University College London (Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment)
Teaches – Advances in DNA Taxonomy (DNTX)

Ziheng Yang holds the RA Fisher Chair of Statistical Genetics at Department of Genetics, Evolution, and Environment, University College London. He develops statistical methods and writes computer programs for phylogenetic and population genetics analyses of sequence data.

His current research projects include estimation of species divergence times incorporating information from molecules and fossils, Bayesian phylogeographic analysis and species tree estimation under the multispecies coalescent model, and modelling protein evolution to understand the impact of selection. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of London. He has won a few awards and published about 200 papers and 2 books. His recent book, Molecular Evolution: A Statistical Approach, has a pretty lizard on the cover.

Prof. Duccio Rocchini

Full Bio:

Works at – University of Trento, Center Agriculture Food Environment,, Italy
Teaches – Introduction to GIS and remote sensing for ecological applications (IRMS)

Duccio Rocchini received his PhD in 2005 at the University of Siena, Italy. He became a researcher at Fondazione Edmund Mach in 2009, after having collaborated with international institutions like U.S. Geological Survey, University of Nottingham (School of Geography, UK), Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment (India), University of California Los Angeles (Department of Geography, US). On February 2017, he was appointed as professor at the University of Trento, Italy.

Dr. Francesco de Bello

Full Bio:

Works at – University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic
Teaches – Functional ecology from organism to ecosystem: theory and computation (FEER)

Dr. Francesco de Bello is an Assistant Professor at the University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic. Together with various colleagues he regularly organizes international courses on functional ecology and has developed several widely-used tools to compute indices of functional diversity and community trait composition. He has published ~90 papers on functional traits. He is trained as a plant ecologist and agronomist. Using meadows and alpine vegetation as a study framework, he assesses the role of functional trait diversity on the interface between community assembly and ecosystem service delivery across different organism types.

Dr. Nic Blouin

Full Bio:

Works at – Research fellow at the University of Rhode Island
Teaches – Bioinformatics for Geneticists and Biologists (BIGB)

Nic is an evolutionary marine biologist who has been using computational tools to answer evolutionary and ecological questions for the past 10 years. He has been involved in several Joint Genome Institute sequencing projects and is the research lead for an additional four whole genome/transcriptome sequencing and annotation projects of marine algae and oomycetes.

He has a commitment to training of organismal biologists in the use of computational tools to improve data handling and analysis. As part of his interests in improving computational literacy for end users, he has recently joined the organizing committee for the Marine Ecological and Marine Genomics (MEEG) summer course held in Roscoff, France each year.

Dr. Luc Bussière

Full Bio:

Works at – Lecturer at the University of Stirling
Teaches – Advancing in Statistical Modelling Using R (ADVR) & Introduction to Statistics and R for Biologists (IRFB)

Luc’s research involves estimating fitness landscapes to test hypotheses about how historical selection has favoured diversification, especially for expensive phenotypic traits such as sexually selected ornaments. Because selection operates on many traits simultaneously, and because phenotypic traits often covary, determining which traits affect fitness is quite challenging, especially when using observational datasets from studies of wild populations. Consequently, Luc has had to learn a number of advanced inferential techniques.

Knowing the importance of mastering these methods, Luc has developed new graduate and undergraduate courses in statistics. These have provided students with valuable analytical skills for both data-rich biological research and industry. His course focus on the practical needs of modern ecologists and evolutionary biologists, and exploit his experience as a scientist, supervisor, editor and teacher.

Dr. Carlos Carmona

Full Bio:

Works at – Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu
Teaches – Functional ecology from organism to ecosystem: theory and computation (FEER)

Dr. Carlos P. Carmona is a researcher at the Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu. His research focuses on plant functional trait-based ecology, including developing and applying methods to incorporate intraspecific trait variability into estimations of functional diversity. He uses functional trait-based approaches to answer pressing ecological questions, such as the response and vulnerability of plant communities and their functioning to species losses. In the last years, he has taught several statistics courses using R, generally aimed at PhD students and researchers. He has experience in R programming including development of packages.

Dr. Luca Delucchi

Full Bio:

Works at – Fondazione Edmund Mach, Research and Innovation Centre, Department of Biodiversity and Molecular Ecology, Italy
Teaches – Introduction to GIS and remote sensing for ecological applications (IRMS)

Luca graduated in Geography at University of Genoa (Italy) in 2008. He is one of the main developer of GRASS GIS. Since 2008 he work at Fondazione Edmund Mach, a research center near Trento, where he started to work with other free and open source GIS software like PostGIS, OpenLayers, MapServer. He is also  an active contributor of OpenStreetMap; he is interested in all aspects of GIS: desktop, web, geodatabase, developing and geodata.

Dr. Diego Fontaneto

Full Bio:

Works at Institute of Ecosystem Study, National Research Council, Verbania Pallanza, Italy
Teaches – Advances in DNA Taxonomy (DNTX)

Diego Fontaneto is a zoologist and an ecologist interested in biological diversity in general, and in particular in how bdelloid rotifers can survive, persist and diversify in the apparent absence of sexual recombination. Given the ubiquity of bdelloids in any habitat, from freshwater to marine, to their unusual ecological characteristics of desiccation resistance, and to their ‘scandalous’ evolutionary features of being considered ancient asexuals, his work is often at the boundary between ecology and evolution. He has been exposed to the different tolls and techniques in DNA taxonomy in the last ten years as an alternative to morphological species identification due to the paucity of taxonomically reliable phenotypic features in bdelloid rotifers.

Dr. Olivier Gauthier

Full Bio:

Works at Maitre de conférences, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France.
Teaches – Advances in Spatial Analysis of Multivariate Ecological Data: Theory and Practice (MVSP)

Olivier is an associate professor in biology at Université de Bretagne Occidentale. He is a quantitative ecologist interested in describing and explaining spatial and temporal community diversity patterns and in the numerical tools needed to so. He primarily works with marine benthic ecologists. His research aims to better understand how local, regional and habitat-dependant variables can constraint taxonomic and functional diversity of marine macrobenthos. He teaches biostatistics and numerical ecology and regularly gives international short courses on the analysis of biological diversity data.

Dr. Lars Goetzenberger

Full Bio:

Works at – The Institute of Botany of the Czech academy of sciences
Teaches – Functional ecology from organism to ecosystem: theory and computation (FEER)

Dr. Lars Götzenberger is a researcher at the Institute of Botany of the Czech academy of sciences. His main interest is in the ecological strategies of vascular plants, trying to understand through which traits these different strategies manifest, how they evolve, and how they are connected to the co-existence of species in communities at different scales. He has taught courses on functional ecology and R-related topics in various forms. Though a plant ecologist by training, his main skills and guilty pleasures include programming in the R language and the use of trait data bases.

Dr. James Grecian

Full Bio:

Works at – Affiliate Researcher of IBAHCM
Teaches – Spatial Analysis of Ecological Data Using R (SPAE)

James is a marine ecologist currently based within the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (IBAHCM) at the University of Glasgow.

His research focuses on quantifying how seabirds interact with the marine environment, particularly the effect that human impacts such as marine renewable energy developments, fisheries and climate change have on seabird foraging behaviour and migration. To answer these questions James uses a range of techniques including bio-logging, stable isotope analysis and quantitative modelling.

Dr. Tom Houslay

Full Bio:

Works at – Associate research fellow at the University of Exeter
Teaches Advancing in Statistical Modelling Using R (ADVR)

Tom’s research interests revolve around explaining individual variation: how do genetic, environmental and social factors interact and contribute to phenotypic diversity?

His PhD research at the University of Stirling integrated life history theory and sexual selection, using advanced statistical models to analyse how individuals allocate limited resources to competing life history traits. Tom’s current research position at the University of Exeter’s Penryn campus focuses on the evolutionary genetics of the stress response, combining experimental manipulations with multivariate quantitative genetic methods.

Tom also has a background in computer programming and bioinformatics, and has employed these skills in posts across both academia and the pharmaceutical industry. He has a broad interest in statistical modelling, and also in the best practices of effective and informative visualisation of quantitative data.

Dr. Andrew Jackson

Full Bio:

Works at – Associate Professor at Trinity College Dublin
Teaches – Stable Isotope Mixing Models using SIAR, SIBER and MixSIAR (SIMM)

Andrew graduated with a science degree in zoology before completing a phd in theoretical ecology and has moved ever further in computational and mathematical ecology over the 9 years since. Andrew’s expertise is in building custom computational and statistical models to better understand the behaviour of ecological and evolutionary systems. As a biologist by training, Andrew is particularly sensitive to the challenge many people face with learning quantitative techniques on top of their already large biological skill-set.

Andrew currently leads a research programme looking at how the rate at which visual information can be acquired and processed varies among individuals and species and he also continues to lead computational methodological developments in stable isotope ecology. He collaborates widely with other scientists working on topics such as: ecological stability, adaptive systems in computer science, epidemiology and sea-bird foraging ecology.

Dr. Jana Jeglinski

Full Bio:

Works at Research Leadership Fellow at the University of Glasgow
Teaches Spatial Analysis of Ecological Data Using R (SPAE)

Jana is a research fellow and lecturer within the Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine at the University of Glasgow. Her research is in the area of spatial and foraging ecology of marine top predators. Her work focuses on sea birds and pinnipeds and has published numerous manuscripts on Galapagos sea lions. Jana uses various methods to gather quantitative data, such as GPS tracking and stable isotope analysis, to gain a better understanding of ecology with particular emphasis on juvenile/adolescent life stages utilising a strong spatial component. The aim of her research is to develop an understanding of how foraging and breeding habitat preferences of individuals influence population-level processes that are relevant for conservation management.

Dr. Thibaut Jombart

Full Bio:

Works at – Lecturer at Imperial College London
Teaches – Genetic data analysis and exploration using R (GDAR)

Thibaut is a Lecturer in genetic analysis at the MRC Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling, Imperial College London. His early career focussed on developing multivariate methods for analysing genetic data, including spatial genetic patterns, group structure, and the phylogenetic comparative method. His current work aims to exploit pathogen genome sequences to understand the spatial-temporal dynamics of infectious diseases such as influenza, plague, or the ongoing West African Ebola outbreak. He is involved in the development of a number of R packages including adegenet, adephylo, geoGraph, outbreaker, OutbreakTools, bmmix, episerve (author) and ade4, and phylobase (contributor).

Dr. Martin Jones

Full Bio:

Works at – Python for biologists
Teaches – Introduction to Python for Biologists (IPYB) and Advanced Python for biologists (APYB)

Martin started his programming career by learning Perl during the course of his PhD in evolutionary biology, and started teaching other people to program soon after. Since then he has taught introductory programming to hundreds of biologists, from undergraduates to PIs, and has maintained a philosophy that programming courses must be friendly, approachable, and practical.

In his academic career, Martin mixed research and teaching at the University of Edinburgh, culminating in a two year stint as Lecturer in Bioinformatics. He now runs programming courses for biological researchers as a full time freelancer.

Dr. Antigoni Kaliontzopoulou

Full Bio:

Works at – Assistant Researcher in CIBIO, Research Center for Biodiversity and Genetic Resources
Teaches – Geometric Morphometrics in R (GMMR)

Antigoni is an evolutionary ecologist interested in the evolution of phenotypic diversity. Her research focuses on disentangling the ecological and evolutionary dynamics underlying phenotypic diversification. She uses wall lizards, and other reptiles and amphibians, as models to address how sexual dimorphism evolves; how ontogeny shapes morphological variation; what determines the geographic structure of phenotypic patterns; which is the influence of environmental variation on the phenotype; and how the combination of these processes shapes micro- and macro-evolutionary diversity patterns.

As a biologist focused in measuring and explaining patters of phenotypic diversity, Antigoni is also interested in the development and dissemination of quantitative methods for addressing ecological and evolutionary questions. For this, she has been involved in developing and teaching workshops and courses in multivariate statistics, geometric morphometrics, and phylogenetic comparative methods.

Dr. Zhian Kamvar

Full Bio:

Works at – University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Teaches  Genetic data analysis and exploration using R (GDAR)

Zhian Kamvar is a Postdoctoral Research Scholar at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln investigating the evolution of fungicide resistance in a plant pathogenic fungus. His doctoral work centres around developing tools for analysis of clonal populations in the R package ‘poppr’. He has contributed to other popgen packages such as adegenet, mmod, and vcfR.

Dr. Ane Timenes Laugen

Full Bio:

Works at – Senior researcher at Åbo Akademi University in Finland
Teaches  Introduction to Statistics and R for Biologists (IRFB)

Ane’s research interests focus on quantifying spatial and temporal variation in evolutionary and ecological processes, including prevalence and consequences of harvest-induced evolution, speed and consequences of species invasions in coastal ecosystems, and effects of climate-related environmental change in ectotherms. In her quest to answer research questions from this wide range of topics she uses both basic and advanced linear models in R to analyse and visualize data from factorial experiments, quantitative genetic breeding designs, field surveys, and time series. She has occasionally played with Bayesian approaches and her bucket list contains the item “go all-Bayesian before retirement”.

Dr. Jonathan Lefcheck

Full Bio:

Works at –  Virginia Institute of Marine Science, The College of William & Mary, Gloucester Point, Virginia. B.A., USA
Teaches –  Structural equation modelling for ecologists and evolutionary biologists (SEMR)

Jonathan Lefcheck is a post-doctoral scholar at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, The College of William & Mary in Virginia. His research interests range from marine community ecology to biodiversity science to ecological statistics, with a focus on seagrass systems. He runs a popular blog for statistical advice, www.jonlefcheck.net/blog, where he interacts with researchers and practitioners over statistical methods, including multivariate community analysis, generalized additive models, and machine learning.

Jonathan has been applying structural equation modelling to ecological data for the better part of a decade, and has published the results in high-ranking journals such as Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Ecology Letters, and Ecology. His recent paper in Methods in Ecology & Evolution presenting a new open-source package to conduct structural equation modelling in R was recently selected as a runner-up for the Robert May prize by the British Ecological Society, which recognizes outstanding contributions by early career researchers.

Dr. Doug McNeall

Full Bio:

Works at – the Met Office Hadley Centre
Teaches – Time series models for ecologists and climatologists using R

Doug studied physics and astronomy and then oceanography at the University of Southampton. He did a doctorate in climate modelling and statistics, jointly between the National Oceanography Centre and the University of Sheffield. Doug now works at the Met Office Hadley Centre, applying his statistics knowledge to a wide range of problems. His main work is on building statistical models that emulate the behaviour of computationally expensive climate models, with the aim of predicting the future impacts of climate change.

You can contact him on twitter @dougmcneall

Dr. Jeroen Minderman

Full Bio:

Works at – The biological and environmental sciences department at the University of Stirling
Teaches – Introduction to Statistics and R for Biologists (IRFB)

Jeroen’s main interests are in behavioural ecology and conservation biology, and ornithology in particular. Specifically, he is interested in understanding and predicting behavioural responses to environmental change (anthropogenic or otherwise) in a range of species and systems.

His current fellowship at the University of St Andrews focuses on linking behavioural responses to different stressors or risks, to physiological stress responses, and previous post docs have been as diverse as quantifying the effects of wind turbines on birds and bats, and developing models for prioritising conservation investments.

All of Jeroen’s work has a strong quantitative basis, and he is particularly interested in the presentation of statistical analyses (including mixed-effects modelling, IT approaches, Bayesian statistics and simulation modelling) as used in biology.

Dr. Ian Misner

Full Bio:

Works at – Bioinformatics coordinator at the University of Maryland
Teaches – Bioinformatics for Geneticists and Biologists (BIGB)

Ian has been working with bioinformatics and genomics for the past 6 years as a biologist. He worked for 3 years completing the genome sequences of two oomycetes while completing his PhD with Dr. Chris Lane at the University of Rhode Island.

He has lead the de novo sequencing, assembly, annotation, and analyses on over 15 genomes. He has also been a lead researcher with a variety of RNAseq projects from model organisms to de novo research projects. He is currently the Bioinformatics Manager of the UMD Bioinformatics Core where he conducts tailored bioinformatics workshops for researchers in and around the University of Maryland.

Dr. Andrew Parnell

Full Bio:

Works at – Chartered statistician at University College Dublin
Teaches – Stable Isotope Mixing Models Using SIAR, SIBER and MixSIAR (SIMM) – Time Series Models for Ecologists and Climatologists (TSME) – Introduction to Bayesian hierarchical modelling (IBHM)

Andrew is a chartered statistician and lecturer with over 10 years’ experience. He enjoys working with big, messy data sets which have hidden relationships that only statistical methods can uncover. Andrews main expertise is in – Feature/variable selection; Multivariate analysis; Stochastic processes and time series analysis; Bayesian inference; Spatial and spatio-temporal modelling; Computational statistics.

He has applied such methods in a diverse range of fields including Climate change (estimating past changes in climate from pollen, estimating changes in extreme for Ireland’s future, estimating worldwide rates of sea level change); Proteomics (finding biomarkers for prostate cancer; Veterinary Science (estimating the factors contributing to elite racehorse ability); Archaeology (radiocarbon dating and age-depth model building); Ecology (stable isotope mixing models to estimate animal diets, monitoring fisheries discard rates in the Irish Sea).

Dr. Emmanuel Paradis

Full Bio:

Works at – Institute of Evolutionary Sciences in Montpellier
Teaches – Phylogenetic data analysis using R (PHYL)

Emmanuel is as senior researcher at the Institute of Evolutionary Sciences in Montpellier. His research activities are centered on the investigation of evolutionary processes at different scales of time and of biological complexity. His approach is to collect data and analyse them to test hypotheses on the dynamics of these relationships. His current projects are on the speciation, extinction, and adaptation among Felidae, and on the statistical and computing tools for models of biological evolution.

Dr. Aline Quadros

Full Bio:

Works at – Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research in Germany
Teaches – Coding, data management, and Shiny applications using RStudio for evolutionary biologists and ecologists (CDSR)

Aline is an ecologist and researcher at the Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research in Germany. Besides research, she is interested in helping biologists to learn how to combine programming skills with statistical techniques to get the most of their data. Before graduating she worked as a freelancer programmer for many years, building applications with Visual Studio and web applications with ASP and SQL. She has been teaching graduate statistics courses with R since 2011.

Dr. Marco Scotti

Full Bio:

Works at – PI of the Research Group on Food Web Modelling at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Germany
Teaches – Network analysis for ecologists and biologists using R (NTWA)

Marco is a theoretical ecologist who got his PhD at the University of Parma. Besides studying ecological networks, he has experience in analysing a wide spectrum of complex systems including social, infrastructural and molecular networks. Marco is mainly interested in food web theory and ecological network analysis. He studies topological and dynamical properties of trophic networks, being often involved even in the phases of experimental data generation and collection. His current playground is represented by the western coast of the Baltic Sea and the mesocosm facilities at GEOMAR. Marco’s research aims at investigating the effects of global change on food web structure and dynamics, with the goal of better understanding possible consequences on ecosystem functioning.

Dr. Neftalí Sillero

Full Bio:

Works at CICGE- Research Center on Geo-Spatial Science of the University of Porto
Teaches – Ecological niche modelling using R (ENMR)

Neftalí Sillero works in the analysis and identification of biodiversity spatial patterns, from species to populations and individuals. For this, he uses four powerful tools to better understand how space influence biodiversity: Geographical Information Systems, Remote Sensing, Ecological Niche Modelling, and Spatial Statistics. His main areas of research are: application of new technologies on species’ distributions atlases, ecological modelling of species’ ranges, identification of biogeographical regions and species’ chorotypes, mapping and modelling road-kill hotspots, and spatial analyses of home ranges.

He has more than 10 years’ experience working in ecological niche models. He has authored >70 peer reviewed publications and he is since 2007 Chairman of the Mapping Committee of the Societas Herpetologica Europaea, where he is the PI of the NA2RE project (www.na2re.ismai.pt), the New Atlas of Amphibians and Reptiles of Europe.

Dr. Péter Sólymos

Full Bio:

Works at – Statistical Ecologist at the Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute and Boreal Avian Modelling Project
Teaches – Spatial analysis of multivariate ecological data using R (MASE)

Dr. Péter Sólymos is a statistical ecologist with a research focus on developing and applying state-of-the-art computational techniques for big data sets to better inform biodiversity conservation and natural resource management over large spatial scales.

Péter is interested in understanding how cumulative effects of human development affect species. He is developing new algorithms and methodologies for more efficient data-information-knowledge pipelines. In addition, Péter has over 10 years of teaching experience in ecology and R programming, he has authored over 50 peer reviewed publications and many R packages among them mefa4, dclone, pbapply, and vegan.

Dr. Dan Warren

Full Bio:

Works at – Coming soon
Teaches – Coming soon

 

Miss Jane Remfert

Full Bio:

Works at – PhD student at Virginia Commonwealth University
Teaches – Landscape genetic data analysis using R (LNDG)

Jane is population geneticist interested in how habitat heterogeneity affects the movement of genes across a landscape and the resulting effect on population genetic structure.  She is currently looking at how native and urban landscape structures affect pollen movement in flowering dogwood (Cornus florida).  Additionally, she is interested in functional effects of gene escape from cultivar to native dogwood populations.  My research draws from GIS, population and quantitative genetics, and landscape ecology.

Miss Marie-Pauline Beugin

Full Bio:

Works at – PhD student in eco-epidemiology at the Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive
Teaches – Genetic data analysis and exploration using R (GDAR)

Marie-Pauline is a PhD student in eco-epidemiology at the Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive (LBBE) in Lyon and the Animal Genetics Laboratory Antagene (Lyon). She studied at the Paris institute of technology for life, food and environmental sciences and specialized in environment management issues. Then, she focused on evolution, genetics and modelling issues during her master degrees. Her current work aims at quantifying the level of hybridization between subspecies of cats in France and assessing how these levels of hybridization may influence the circulation of viruses.

Mr. John O’Sullivan

Full Bio:

Works at – PhD student in Statistical Climatology at the University College of Dublin
Teaches – Time series models for ecologists (TSME)

John O’Sullivan is a PhD student of Statistical Climatology at the University College of Dublin (UCD). His research involves the study of spatial statistics and their application to help us to better understand climate extremes in Ireland. John has a B.A. in Maths from Trinity College Dublin and an M.Sc. in Meteorology and Climatology from UCD. He also has a B.A. in Media Production. In addition to his own research interests, he currently lectures in statistics, decision making, and quantitative analysis.

Miss Emma Howard

Full Bio:

Works at – PhD student in data analytics and mathematics at University College Dublin
Teaches – Time series models for ecologists (TSME)

Emma Howard is a PhD student in the interdisciplinary fields of mathematics education and data analytics. The overall focus of her PhD is identifying and supporting struggling students in large mathematics/statistics courses. Her approach includes investigating predication methods to identify at-risk students, developing an understanding of why students choose to engage with specific module resources, and developing supporting feedback systems for students. She is also interested in student withdrawals on a university-wide level.